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story broke just after secretary of defense hagel had announced plans to scale back the american military. we're going to pick up the interview. i want to talk to you about the military budget that you outlined. you want to reduce the size of th army to the smallest size since before world war ii. how do you reduce the size of the american military without making it look like, to the people around the world, that we're somehow retreating, that we're withdrawing from all of this. >> you start, bob, with the reality of where we are in the world today. this budget that is the first budget in 12 years that's not a budget based on war footing. we've been at war for 1 years constantly. two wars. we're out of one war, iraq. and we're coming out of the longest war we've ever been, afghanistan. not unlike after every war the united states has been in, you reset your posture. you reset your assets. you reset your whole enterprise based on the new realities and based on preparing that institution for the challenges of the future. to answer your question, how do you adjust to the dangerous c
. between the department of defense and the va and i know we're in the process of tearing that down. we're one family. when you take that oath and say i'm going to serve this country, it should go right on through. there shouldn't be this wall and this divide between the opportunities that exist to take care of our troops. electronic medical records that he spoke about, to me that is a shame and delays care, makes it more difficult to have a smooth flow of care. i do see positive things. i was at base luis mccord last year and seen start upprograms where they are focusing on transition at the time of ets. and it makes sense to me if you are disabled, getting a medical separation that your level of disability can be determined at that time and carry over into the va. instead of having to go through these processes and having redone the services. there's other things i see starting to take place and that's guiding as they are leaving the military into being able to use the skills they learned in the military and translate them into civilian work and helping them get there and guidance on
served since 2002, also focusing on afghanistan. 2013, he has served as the secretary of defense for afghanistan, pakistan and central asia with the assistant secretary of self-defense. prior to this he was deputy assistant secretary of defense for east asia, and then he also served as the dcm at the u.s. embassy in beijing. and last, but not least, it is a pleasure to welcome back an old friend and former u.s. ip colleague. from june 2010 to june 2013, alex thier served for afghanistan and pakistan affairs. before joining u.s. aa, he served here at u.s. ip is a senior advisor and director for afghanistan and pakistan from -- for 2005 and 2010. from 2002 to 2004, he served as an advisor in kabul and also in the 1990's worked in afghanistan for the you and -- . r the un with that i will turn it over to you, mr. grossman. then we will have some time for question and answers. >> thank you very much. let me say thanks to all the organizers of this event and what an honor it is to be on this panel. having served as a special representative, i know what this is about. if you will allow
dispute processes that are based on decisions on the merits and not technical defenses. there was a great burst of activity in the american community. the national gallery, nancy returned a piece of art, which they found which was well-known, at the chicago art institute, and others. but then what happened is, after a terrific momentum creating a search engine, so a claimant wouldn't have to go to one or different museums in the united states, they could buy one going into we go to all 100 museums. all of this was done, christie's and sotheby's established and still have full-time employees who look for any suspect art, and i was in any given year a dozen are returned and won't be sold. but here's what happened, and it's a shame. is that momentum was lost. the leadership of the u.s. show really began to dissipate, and the museums overtime started to assert technical defenses when claims were made like, for example, the statute of limitations has run. they even preemptively filed injunction suits to prevent claims before they were made. they said they did it after researching it themselves
the case in arizona, businesses to use religion as a defense in a private lawsuit. so to give you an example of how that might play out, you know, let's say you live in a state where it's illegal to fire someone because they're gay. now, if one of these bills passes, that company could turn around and say, oh, hey, i think homosexuality is a sin, therefore i'm going to fire you and i don't need to abide by this law. so, you know, that lawsuit provision is a big deal. >> i know in some of the cases, in some of the states where they've been considering this, the lawsuit provision works in such a way not only can you not sue somebody for discriminating against you, but if you do, you have to pay their legal fees as well as your own so it's almost a punishment for even complaining about being discriminated against. it's fascinating stuff and fast-moves story. dana lieblson, reporter for "mother jones." nice to see you. >> thanks for having any. >>> the federal prosecutor's investigation of the george washington bridge scandal in chris christie's new jersey has taken a turn today. we'v
.9 trillion request includes $495 billion for the defense department. >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you for being here. as you know today we have the presentation of the president's budget. for today's briefing, as part of that introduction and presentation, i have with me the director of the office of management and budget, sylvia burwell. i have jason furman, the chairman of the president's council of economic advisors. cecilia munoz, the director of the domestic policy council, and gene sperling, the director of the economic council. each of my guests will have an opening statement and then we'll take questions related to budget matters. i'll try to direct traffic in that question and answer session. i will have comments on ukraine, but if you could hold questions on those subjects not related to the budget until after we're done with q&a on the budget that will be terrific. and with that i turn it over to sylvia. >> thanks, jay. the president's 2015 budget, which we released earlier today, is basically a fiscal road map for accelerating economic growth, expanding opportunity and ens
we love to hate russia? is it deserved? oscar pistorius's defense hammers a witness. she cries sayinging it was awful to hear the shots. what we know about the night of the killing. >>> the crisis in ukraine. vladimir putin will do next. joining me now is robert legvald and general mark kimmet and fareed zakaria. fareed, we spoke last night and had a fascinating debate about the state of play. i want to play you a clip. this is president clinton talking to me at the cgi last september about his own dealings with vladimir putin because it seems to me that trust in putin right now is absolutely key. listen to this. >> mr. putin has got -- he's very smart. >> you know him better than most people. >> yeah, i do. >> what was he like behind closed doors away from sort of the public utterances? >> smart and remarkably -- we had a really good, blunt relationship. >> how blunt? >> brutally blunt. >> did putin ever renege on a personal agreement made to you? >> no, he did not. >> behind closed doors he could be trusted. >> he kept his word in all the deals we made. >> i found that fascin
unity force control on the ground. the ukrainian defense chief, according to afp, has said that russia has sent at least 6000 troops to crimea. that is the headline coming out of the af he this morning. about 41 minutes ago. there is a picture of some of the unidentified armed men in front of the crimean parliament. let's go to mark, waiting in massachusetts on our line for independence. -- line for independents. caller: i think russia definitely has a right to protect their interests. they have bases down there. i know the ukrainian government is set up. is there any real military force ? if some he wants to come in and -- do harmia people in the upheaval. it, maybes down to crimea will secede and become their own country. russia today reporting in an interview with the russian dispense -- defense minister that russia has 150,000 troops and 90 aircraft, 800 80 tanks and 1200 pieces of military hardware involved in drills on the ukrainian border right now. that doesn't concern you? host: i didn't know that they had that much stockpile. the do have their whole fleet. strength already hu
intelligence. who are they all? four of them, the largest are in the defense department. the national security agency which has been in the news a lot. the national geospatial intelligence agency where i worked for a couple of years. they take pictures from satellites. the defense intelligence agency does mostly intelligence matters. then, the national reconnaissance office which manages satellites. and a lot of people think you launch a satellite and it is just up there. no, you fly a satellite. you determine where it will be and then you maintain it. that is what they do. two intelligence agencies focused primarily on the united states. the fbi and the department of homeland security. they're concerned with threats and terrorist organizations and they work with state and local governments. then you have the treasury department. the drug enforcement agency. their work should be obvious. the energy department which is where my security clearance currently resides which looks after nuclear matters and energy matters. we also have each of the five armed forces as its own intelligence branch. you
you back 14 years. defense secretary donald rumsfeld said we're going to have a revolution in the future we're not going to be fighting lower-tech fights. we need a high-tech force. and that's what happened when a bunch of guys with box cutters went on planes. we don't know, the responsibility of the superpower can be prepared for a variety of contention. >> is the american public prepared to finance what brett is talking about? >> what happened in europe, the german army is 32,000 or something like that. they simply don't have the defense spending such as the french and british. >> american public will support these kinds of commitments only if the american president uses the leadership to explain to them why it's necessary. and let's sort of understand the context. you mentioned the pivot to asia. made a special trip to asia to reassure that it was real. they doubted our commitment to syria. in all of the areas of the world that senses the united states is pulling back. and if we cut through defense forces like this, they're going to start making deals with whoever they n
from the head of defense committee who said that the defense committee looked into it, and they unanimously approve the action. there was the head of the foreign affairs committee also saying that they had looked into it, and they were unanimously approving what the president was asking for. we have the deputy speaker of the upper chamber. they were saying there were militants from maidan who were trained in poland and lithuania, and they also called for the russian ambassador from the u.s. to be recalled. they said that yanukovych was still the legitimate head of the ukraine. so the message is absolutely the same from everyone who is speaking at the moment. the vote has not happened yet. we don't know quite how it's going to take, so we will be watching. >> errorrory, it does sound like steps are being taken for some sort of intervention. does it mean that troops will be going into crimea? >> reporter: well, we don't know exactly what it means. the proposal is quite vague. it didn't even specify crimea. it said that military involvement could take place in ukraine. so
was called the western defense zone. so they were we moved -- removed, they were forced to leave, and they were put in camps surrounded by barbed wire, and they were not charged with anything in particular. west coast non-japanese-americans, the population in general, most poll constitutions, most newspapers strongly supported the removal of japanese-americans. it was a very popular policy locally. the civil rights organizations which were largely based back east didn't pay much attention to it. in all of the major jewish newspapers on the west coast, they were weeklies, and they had editorials talking about how the rights of all are to be protected, and we should fight prejudice in all of it forms and so on and so forth without ever saying the word "japanese" specifically, so it was almost as if they wanted to say something but were nervous about actually doing so. so there was, i call it a kind of awkward silence or an uncomfortable silence around this issue that i started to investigate more. >> this weekend booktv and american history tv look behind the history and literary l
at where the money goes. billion for defense spending. that is what congress have control over's. nondefense, $563 billion. point $9nding is three trillion. 800 $96 billion for social security. 526care eats up about billion dollars. medicaid, 330 6 billion dollars. other mandatory spending comes in at $691 billion. interest on the debt, $252 billion. where the money is race, taxes.ual income 237 billion. other taxes comes to $363 billion. proposal reduces the deficit $564 billion. gail, republican color. -- caller. caller: it is driving the country over the cliff. died over 60 years ago and my mother taught me how to live within my means. this president does not know how to do that. you cannot spend what you do not have. he wants to give money to the -- gals and the you are looking to hurt anyone that does have a little bit. host: tax the rich. that is obama's main theme. where is the job creation atmosphere? budget.it is a good it is what we voted for by reelecting barack obama a second time. budget and it has 651 billion dollars in new revenue from the rich via changes to the
this budget request, one fact was front and center. nation's % of the budget, america's defense has never been more vital to our economic prosperity or global leadership. whether in the mideast, ukraine, europe or our own hemisphere, diplomacy is needed now more than ever. investments in diplomacy and development are returned to us in security and jobs. this budget funds the work that is required to sustain long-term investment while regular recognizing the fiscal constraints we face as a nation. details are online, i'll just hit a few highlights here. the overall request is $46.2 billion. the base budget of $40.3 billion is consistent with the f.y. 2014 level this will enable us to carry out our global, dip lo -- ur global diplomatic and other missions, honor our commitments o allies and partners, keep up wur opiece keap -- peacekeeping activities and respond to crises such as the typhoon in the fill peeps. it funds key programs in iraq and afghanistan and helps sustain hard-fought gains in afghanistan. the budget also enables us to respond to the ongoing humanitarian and refugee crisis
criminal defense at trial and appellate levels. he has tried nationwide and argued before a number of federal courts of appeals in the united states supreme court. without objection, your full statement will appear in the record. the chair is requesting witnessess confine the testimony to five years. you have experience with red, yellow and green lights. you know what they are. >> microphone? >> it is on. there it goes. thank you chairman, ranking members, and other task fort members. thank you for to opportunity to return. it is an honor to return to the committee and i am comfortable as addressing the chair as mr. chairman. it is also an honor to return to the committee to appear before ranking member scott, when whom i worked on many issues and bobby as well who contributed to the work. my years on the staff were some of the best. and now i welcome to opportunities to address the task force on criminal code reform. this issue is near and dear to my heart. mr. chairman, you have thread charge by introducing the criminal code modernization act. having worked on this legislation, i
and hezbollah's efforts to destabilize the region. state and defense department officials testified at the hearing which also covered the refugee crisis caused by the one million syrian refugees who now live in lebanon. this is just under two hours. >> i want to call this meeting of the senate foreign relations committee, the subcommittee on the near east, and central asian affairs to order. i want to welcome all who are here, especially our four expert witnesses who we'll hear testimony from today. the senate is currently in the middle of a vote on a veterans' bill that will take a bit of time, but i want to take advantage of folks being here. we will proceed to a first panel and then a second panel with questions, and this is a very important topic. the topic of the hearing today is lebanon at the crossroads. i just returned from a trip in lebanon last week with senator angus king of maine. we went together because we served together on -- serve together on armed services and budget committees, but i'm on the foreign relations committee, and senator king's on the intelligence comm
and that the forces in southern ukraine are not troops but merely self-defense teams. putin is not taking the action of force off the table to protect russian-speaking ukrainians. he called them brothers in arms which is puzzling when you hear warning shots over the heads of unarmed ukrainian troops. the stand off begins with one russian soldier warning that he will shoot. ukrainian responds, america is with us. another ukrainian pleads, would you shoot the soviet flag and then asks to speak to the commander so they can negotiate. the russian tells the ukrainians to back off and warns he will shoot their legs if they keep advancing. but, look, who hasn't threatened to blast off their brother's kneecaps? diana magnay is on the ground there in kiev. i wonder what you make of the warning shots that were fired today. are tensions rising there? >> reporter: well, it's a very mysterious situation here. tensions seem pretty high and then the next moment you turn around and have ukrainian and russian forces sort of having a chat and exchanging fuel to fuel the russian generators. so it is a very strange sit
, let's get right to defense secretary chuck hagel because there is an extraordinary optic out there. earlier today at nato headquarters in brussels secretary hagel issued a warning to moscow. and how many years has it been since a u.s. defense secretary had to do that? i want you to listen to what he had to say. >> i'm closely watching russia's military exercises along the ukrainian border, which they announced as you know yesterday. i expect russia to be transparent about these activities. and i urge them not to take any steps that could be misinterpreted or lead to m miscalculation during a very delicate time, a time of great tension. >> a direct warning from the u.s. to the russian military. so what is going on along that border? well, russian forces now on alert conducting those exercises. the big worry, wolf, is as they move closer to that border with ukraine, as they move around and exercise and train, if that is indeed what they are doing, they get closer to the border if, if, they were to get orders to move into ukraine. they are that much closer, they could move very quickl
'll be talking about the impact of the defense cuts that chuck hagel announced, which by the way, perfect timing, he announced defense cuts and the russians say we'll ramp an invasion of ukraine. and in arizona the controversial bill and we'll learn how the bill is the exact language of the bill that bill clinton signed and was passed unanimously in the house and 97-3 in the senate back in 1993. it's a real big controversy over a very, very small issue. >> fascinating. well, we look forward to seeing you tonight, and as always we thank you for your insights. always a pleasure to have uf, sir. >> thank you, uma. always great to be here. >>> we want to hear from you at home. does the u.s. have any clout left when it comes to issuing so-called red lines to world leaders? tweet us your answers to us and i will read some of your responses later in our show. >>> now, turning to another story that continues to raise concerns here about our military and its future in afghanistan, with talk of a drawdown of troops by the end of the year, the u.s. is still locked in a battle with afghan president hamid ka
.s. government money at all in that panel so that these disputes could be done without the technical defenses. i am sad to say that after the passage of 50 years of the event revived it through the washington principles that we have really fallen back, stagnated and we need to get back into fulfilling what the monument data. that would be the attribute to the monument is to get back to where we were then. >> what is the committee doing and can you make it short please? ddmac i would respectfully disagree and i just thought we needed a commission in the united states and those that are set up in your car for a totally different category that were recovered after the war and were known to have some kind of issue and in the custody of those countries. the objects in the american collection are hereby happenstance and what the community has done since the conference, which the ambassador was so instrumental in is adopting these guidelines for the research publications that they are misleadingly simple guidelines into the research for it sample in the museum this specific research into the world war
russia wouldn't be enough saying reintroducing plans to build missile defense sites in poland and admitting georgia to the nato alliance. thing is wacky. let's watch it. >> very much cares about testimonisy on his borders. i would like to create a democratic noose around putin's russia. poland and the czech republic. we abandoned our missile defense agreements with them to protect europe from a rogue missile attack coming out of the mideast. russia backed obama down. if i were president obama, i would reengage poland and the czech republic regarding missile defense. i would admit georgia to nato. i would have a larger military presence in the balkans to nato members who are threatened by russia. i would fly the nato flag as strongly as i could around putin. >> normally that would be harmless. that's just lindsey graham channeling cooley from advise and consent, the only southern rascal anti-communist. but the danger here, it seems to me what we should be trying to do is get the genie back in the bottle over there. get russia to limit its invasion to crimea. slowly withdraw it
are in the top 10. new york claimed the vote defensive title for north america, but fell to 26 overall. paris charges the highest average price for a liberal natural -- liter of petrol. the french capital is beholden to the cheapest bottles of wine. benjamin netanyahu is readying his speech to the biggest row israel lobby in washington. president told u.s. barack obama he will never compromise on israel posse purity. israel's security. the u.s. president hiked up the pressure, saying it would be harder to protect israel if these efforts with the palestinian's failed. meeting face-to-face coming yards and to make the decisions needed to salvage the peace process. >> some decisions are going to have to be made, but i know that the prime minister will make those decisions based on his estimate of israel's security. >> he said it was for the palestinians to deliver. >> they have uprooted entire settlements. released hundreds of terrorist prisoners, including dozens of -- israel has been doing its part. the palestinians have not. >> new settlement building and the west bank doubled last year, and
around putin's russia. poland and the czech republic, we abandoned our missile defense agreements with them to protect europe from a rogue missile attack coming out of the mid east. russia backed obama down. if i were president obama, i would reengage poland and the czech republic regarding missile defense. i would admit georgia to nato. would have a larger nato presence in the balkans. i would fly the nato flag as strong as i could around putin. >> he is rubbing his face. president roosevelt once said don't mention the word rope in a family where there has ban hanging. here is a thought there. the weekly standard's bill kristol explained that humiliation was the way to go when it comes to the russian leader. let's listen to bill. >> we are too quick to say, to proclaim our own helplessness. and i'm not as fatalistic as jeffrey. if america got its back up and got serious, i think the europeans would follow. i don't expect them to lead in this respect. we could make life pretty miserable for putin in a lot of ways. >> but there has to be a way to find a face-saving solution or some
." the press secretary to the defense security. democratic line. mark inmove on to michigan. serious things to talk about. independent line. caller: good morning. good morning america. you know what is going on in ukraine? chris explains it very well. there is a mass extinction underway. the wealthiest of our societies around the world have taken over government, they have taken over military, and in order to slow down this, they are eradicating poverty. host: thank you for the call. some photographs yesterday -- this is from crimea. some of those russian flags appearing. crimea accounts for 10% of the total land mass of ukraine. a country over 40 million people. mitch joins us from tennessee. good morning. caller: hello? host: you are on their. -- the air. caller: putin is afraid of what is happening in crimea and what will happen in his country. there is going to be a civil war there. he does not want this to happen in his country, because then he will be live on tv, killing protesters. it will be a big mess. that is already what is happening in crimea. he is just afraid that if they do n
to bush and obama's secretary of defense bob gates who said this: "it seems to me that trying to speak with one voice, one american voice, has become a quaint thing of the past. i regret that enormously. and so do i. there's nothing more frightening to our enemy than a strong, united voice. it's incumbent upon his political rivals to encourage him privately, not provide political broadsides in public. there's going to be a lot of time to do that during the political campaigns but for now washington leaders should measure their words a bit more carefully because, richard, not on is the whole world watching, vladimir putin is watching. do you agree with secretary gates and myself that you can disagree with the president of the united states, the commander in chief without going out making extreme political broadsides? >> absolutely. what makes it more relevant here, i may be in a minority, but i don't think vladimir putin had in his closet a 16-point plan for ukraine. i think he's improvising and making it up as he's going along, looking for opportunities, playing off what it is we say a
of us that the chinese and iranians are watching this feeble response as we're gutting our defenses and they're planning their own next moves. it's not a good picture. >> colonel, we know that president obama and president putin spoke on the phone for about an hour and a half. do you think president obama understands the gravity of the situation and how important ukraine really is? >> no. in fact, i don't think that they recognize that this is a foretaste of what's to come if we continue the path that we're on for unilateral disarmament. we've got to stop battering our allies, like israel with the lunacy of trading land for peace. we need to build the xl pipeline, which our canadian allies want us to do and the obama administration can't figure out how to do it. if the iranians close the straights of hormuz next week, the price of oil is going to go through the roof and the economy is going to grind to a halt. all of these are the kinds of things that when america decides, a, we're not going to lead, and b, we're going to destroy the opportunity to deter this kind of action with a s
defense zone over thousands of miles in the pacific. this is a very dangerous precedent that's been setting. iraq was a disaster. this was an even lower precedent for military intervention. putin has sort of outplayed us over the last decade. now germany gets 40% of its natural gas from russia. he knows that. he thinks the germans won't back sanctions. it is angela merkel, the german chancellor, who's saying we should not kick russia out of the g8. it's hurting him economically. it's isolating him. you don't give him the olympic games. you don't allow him in the g8. you hold him accountable. and i agree with steve, you have a strategy to isolate putin. putin is dangerous. putinism is dangerous. this rise of authoritarianism is something we need counter patiently, slowly, but consistently over time. >> steve, one of the problems in a situation like this is the ultimate action no one is willing to take. there is no one saying we should be willing to go to war with russia over this incursion. and once you eliminate getting into an actual shooting conflict, that eliminates an awful lot
self-defense forces." president obama responded to that claim today by saying of president putin, "i don't think that he's fooling anybody." but whether or not president putin is out to lunch, whether or not he really is trying to fool anybody, whether he's just saying patently, obviously untrue things as kind of a one-finger salute to the rest of the world and the world's media, his world view, his bizarre explanation of what he says he's doing, of what he says is going on in russia's corner of the world isn't just a warshock test, isn't just a psychological exercise about how two different ends of the telescope make the world look like two very different places. these two totally different understandings of what's going on in the world, one from vladimir putin, one from everybody else in the world, these two different perspectives on what's happening there are manifesting on the ground in places like the ukrainian air base in belbek. when we signed off on this show last night, the live version of this show at 10:00 p.m. eastern time, at that moment at 10:00 p.m. eastern, we were hi
served for 33 years in the military, i'm confident we can make the defense budget more efficient while at the same time enhancing programs that grow our economy and protect our children and seniors. we should start by reducing waste in contracting and procurement. today we spend millions to have contract security, guards check i.d. at our bases rather than service members, but no one is any safer. i take responsibility to fix this. it is a privilege to be chosen to serve on the agriculture committee. i am the only member of montana's delegation to sit on the agriculture committee. this committee is so important to montana where our number-one industry is agriculture. from livestock disaster assistance to crop insurance, common sense forest reforms, i look forward to making sure the farm bill works and works efficiently from montana's farmerrers and ranchers. i also look forward to serving on the commerce committee where i will focus on transportation, energy, rural telecommunications and tourism. tourism is montana's second largest sector. it not only contributes to our state's economy
simply concluded that the officers acted in self-defense. the la county sheriff's department refused to discuss the case with us at all, but there's been no acknowledgement that anything other than their standard procedures were followed. but when the standard is a rise in military-style tactics, it means the costs are rising too. >> with that room all bloody like that. it's been 5 months. i go in there every day. i relive it every day. after almost a week in hiding, ukraine's ousted president is making a milk statement, viktor yanukovych appears defiant. claims he's still the president. copies of clinton's speeches, talking points for interviews, some of the records come from then first lady hillary clinton's office. >>> a deep bow of shame from the disgraced bitcoin president, 850,000 bitcoins lost due to the flaws in security software. i'm john siegenthaler. see you back here at 11:00 eastern. authorities leave before they get trapped with mudslides. "consider this" with antonio mora is next. i'll see you back here at 11:00. >> russia ranches up the pressure on ukraine and preside
concluded that the officers acted in self-defense. the la county sheriff's department refused to discuss the case with us at all, but there's been no acknowledgement that anything other than their standard procedures were followed. but when the standard is a rise in military-style tactics, it means the costs are rising too. >> with that room all bloody like that. it's been 5 months. i go in there every day. i relive it every day. >> tafficked labor on the front lines? >> they're things...they're commodities... >> we go undercover... >> it isn't easy to talk at this base... >> what's happining on u.s. bases... >> the taxpayer directly pays the human trafficker. >> fault lines... al jazeera america's hard hitting... >> they're locking the doors... >> groung breaking... >> they killed evan dead. >> truth seeking... >> they don't wanna show what's really going on... >> breakthough investigative documentary series america's war workers only on al jazeera america >>> welcome to a al jazerra america being i am morgan radford live in new york city and here are the top stories we are following fo
. los angeles may seem like an odd place to search for answers to ptsd. but the department of defense is finding encouraging results through partnerships with research institutes like the one at usc. skip riz izzo has experience in systems. >> buttoned down as the military why would they come to you guys for help? >> we're the odd alliance of hollywood, the military and academe ya bu academia. come from an interdisciplinary coming-together of people with different levels of expertise that can create something where the whe whole is greater than te sum of its parts. what we have seen over the past ten years is that the advances that have mapped in the area of technology have -- happened in the area of technology, making a difference for service members and veterans when they come back, the psychological difficulties. >> the institute for creative technology has created bravemind, a clinical interactive virtual reality tool. subjects are gradually immersed in environments to which they were deployed. from a remote afghan village to an iraqi marketplace, to recreate the situation that br
giving our nato partners that we stand shoulder to shoulder with them in defense of their sovereignty and independence? do. think they know that we these countries are very important members of nato. i mentioned earlier that our strong commitment to nato, including maintaining the strongest armed forces in europe, all around, but it will be important for other countries strengthen their own military budgets and defenses over the coming years. that is something i have advocated for a long time. i think it would be of additional insurance to them. >> president putin has shown very clearly that under his leadership, russia will not respect the border and the sovereignty of a friendly neighbor. as a president who prides himself in answering russia's self-interest, should he not be alarmed to the market reaction of that? shouldn't the individual states of the european notion -- european union decide -- how can invest in russia? >> that is an important point. i think russia will have underestimated the longer-term consequences of the action that they have just taken because there is an impo
all because the department of defense refused to classify the assault as anything but workplace violence. now those soldiers being hit with more bad news. their live expenses are set to skyrocket. sergeant lunsford was shot seven times in that attack, not able to get the benefits he deserves and now this. how does this resonate with you? i'm talking about the proposed budget cuts and what it means to people like you? >> with the budget cuts that are coming down for our current service members, it is very detrimental to them. it's basically showing them they're not worth that much. in terms of war, this is like being a body being expendable, g.i. issue. it is sad because when we join the military they say we're family strong first as far as army component. with everyone else, it kind of makes you wonder is this a choice we really should make and that's a large because we do need to defend our standard of living in our country. >> quickly, 9/11 we had a different enemy than we had on september 10. the only thing we know is we're not ready to fight any battle let alone the one that
of the family of nations and also begin looking at redeploying the missile defense system. >> speaking of deployment, what's going on are -- going on with the russian troops, tphrad me putin ordered military exercises near the ukraine. sounds like he's pulling them back. exercises were scheduled to end any way today. the question is are they amassing to go someplace else? >> we'll keep you updated on secretary kerry's arrival as well. in the meantime, heather, you've got headlines? >> today is day two of the oscar pistorius trial and it's been dramatic. an interruption in the courtroom happening a short while ago -fplgt a prosecutor stopping pistorius's lawyer during cross-examination to announce the witness, his image was being broadcast on live television. this despite a court order that guaranteed privacy for the witnesses who requested it. that witness who was on the understand was pistorius' next door neighbor, the same one who testified yesterday that she heard bloodcurdling screams and gunshots the day of the killing. pistorius shot and killed his girlfriend last day at his vale
out of the loop on some of these decisions. it's not going a defense she is going to use. her plan is to stick with president obama, but it makes it hard for her to charter her own course as she heads out on this campaign. we have seen ian senator john mccain who you know is very supportive of her in the past and joked about her and said she was totally wrong about this. >> julie, this shows the long march to entering the race for hillary clinton, the longer this drags out, the more hits she is going to take. whatever issue of the day comes up, it's a link somehow to hillary clinton. >> absolutely. especially if it's something that happened on foreign policy when she was secretary of state. i mean, that red reset button moment we are going to see played over and over again. i actually am interested to hear from her on what she was thinking at that time and whether she thinks that was the right policy given what we have seen now. >> and gene robinson, there are going to be a lot of issues that she is going to be exposed on if she runs moving forward and a lot of people think she is
-- madam speaker, as i listen to the secretary of defense, chuck hagel, yesterday talk about the financial pressure on our military and the budget that he will be supporting that mr. obama has proposed, i wonder why we in congress are not allowed to debate on the floor of this house whether we as the house, not talking about the senate now, whether we believe that we should have a 10-year agreement with afghanistan. again, we are talking about spending anywhere from $3 billion to $4 billion a month. it is borrowed money from the chinese and japanese, and we continue to raise the debt ceiling because we can't -- cannot pay our own bills. it is time for the congress to speak out on behalf of the american people and say enough is enough. to be clear, this agreement that president karzai has adamantly refused to sign, as "the washington post" reported earlier this week, during a december visit to kabul, hagel suggested that the late february nato meaning, this week, was a cutoff point for president karzai to sign the bilateral strategic agreement that sets the terms for a post-2014 u.s. presen
the cold war. we do not need the star wars defense shield. isolateto economically russia and show them that the $60 billion that he spent for the olympics is almost equal to for the 36pense olympics. this off of twitter -- deeply concerned that russia will expand its military intervention in ukraine. sts"a needs to impose "co now. here's bethany, columbia, maryland. independent line. that the media is and they vilify the russian president and there is still those cold war mentality that the russians are always wrong and they are always bad and they are some sort of monsters. go towesterners the rescue. that is not always true. host: what you think the proper response should be? they should let the russians and ukrainians figure out what is best for them. there is truth about the outer-nationalists. they are not good for the ukraine. -- majority of ukrainians they voted for the president. the president was elected. he won the majority. from the very beginning they hated him and they wanted to depose him. westhey think of the automatically takes up their side. conflictsilitary happen, do
is this barrier would create a second line of defense for pilots during the seconds that the cockpit door is open when a pilot leaves to use the restroom or even to receive food. now, her husband, victor, he was a captain of united flight 175, which crashed into the world trade center. a bill mandating these barriers was introduced in the house last april. another bill introduced in the senate last september. she has support, 54 co-sponsors in the house, and today with the video you just saw she's hoping to convince senators to sign on. wolf? >> what does the tsa have to say about this? >> well, we eno that the tsa believes this should be a decision left up to the airlines as to whether they will install these barriers. but they said in a statement that tsa applies a layered risk-based approach to security. that means hardened cockpit doors, armed pilots, crew self-defense training as well as air marshals. >> rene, thank you. let's talk about this video. why did you decide to do this? >> because nobody is moving quick enough. it's 13 years later. and we seem now to have airlines -- we had one air
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